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Theatre Arts

Independence Community College offers our Theatre Arts students a unique educational experience, which affords them direct contact with more professional guest artists than any other College or University in Kansas. Our students join an ensemble in which they learn, work, and grow together through a specialized system of training, as they earn a transferable Associate of Arts Degree in Theatre. 

Theater Performers

The Theatre Department, located in the Fine Arts Building, is home to the renowned and publicly acclaimed William Inge Theatre Festival, which is the Official Theatre Festival of the State of Kansas. Named for William Inge, the Pulitzer Prize and Academy Award-winning writer and alumnus of ICC, this annual festival honors the craft of playwriting and theatre and offers students the opportunity to work with professionals in the fields of acting, directing, playwriting, and technical theatre. 

The Associate of Arts Degree in Theatre is a two-year curriculum designed to transfer to theatre programs in four-year colleges and universities. A degree in Theatre Arts opens a world of opportunity for careers that include: Actor, Director, Playwright, Producer, Casting Director, Talent Agent, Literary Manager, Stage Manager, Technical Director, Company Manager, Project Manager, or an Artistic Director just to name a few.

If you would like more information about the Theater Arts Program at Independence Community College, please contact:

ICC Theater Department
theatre@indycc.edu

ICC offers a variety of scholarships. All scholarships are awarded by the Department/Activity in which the student participates.

https://indycc.formstack.com/forms/icc_scholarship_app

 Dr. PAGE PETRUCKA is the theatre acting and playwriting instructor. She is an actor of the stage and screen, theatre director, and award-winning, published playwright. She received her PhD in Fine Arts from Texas Tech University, and her Master's from Utah State University. Prior to accepting a position at ICC, she taught theatre for Utah Valley University and Brigham Young University. As an actress, she has performed nationally and internationally. Some of her favorite roles include Mrs. Bennet in Pride and Prejudice (Northampton, England), Mrs. Gibbs in Our Town (Texas Tech University), and Dotty/Mrs. Clackett in Noises Off (Mercury Theatre). Her play Return to Roswell (which she both wrote and acted in) has been performed in Utah, Texas, and the Czech Republic. The play won the Texas Educational Theatre Association Playwriting award in 2013 and is currently being published by Next Stage Press. She is, however, perhaps most recognized for her roles in Hallmark Christmas movies. 

Associate Professor
Dr. Page Petrucka
(620) 332-5446
ppetrucka@indycc.edu

 PAUL MOLNAR grew up in Michigan but spent the last 20 years in NYC working as an actor, director, movement consultant, fight choreographer and producer.  Paul was a founding member and Producing Artistic Director of South Brooklyn Shakespeare, a Not-For-Profit company devoted to bringing FREE Shakespeare and other Classic Works of Literature to the residents of South Brooklyn for 6 seasons.  Directing credits include: Twelfth Night, Much Ado About Nothing, A Midsummer Night's Dream, Romeo & Juliet (SBS), Macbeth -a witch's tale, Hiker/Driver, The Gospel of Cyrus according to Cyrus (Asolo Late Night Series).  As an actor: New York credits include the Off-Broadway premier of Hot Mess, multiple shows with KEEN Company, Epiphany, Adobe, Tangent and Fifth Street Theatre.  Regional credits: Premier Stages, Asolo Rep, Vermont Stage, Lost Nation, Michigan Shakespeare Festival, The Shakespeare Theatre of New Jersey, New American Theatre and 12 Miles West Theatre.  TV/ Film credits include: Law & Order, Law & Order SVU and Person of Interest. As a Fight Director: Off-Broadway credits include Party Face (Directed by Amanda Bearse & Staring Hayley Mills), Roulette, Tape, Ghoul, work with DiCapo Opera, EST, 47th Street Theatre.  Other New York credits include Fordham University, Queens College, MITF, and Keen Company where he was the Resident Company Fight Director.  Regional credits: Buck's County Playhouse, Premiere Stages, Two River Theatre, Shakespeare on the Sound, The Shakespeare Theatre of New Jersey, Michigan Shakespeare Festival, Second City (Detroit) & Asolo Rep.  Paul got his BFA from The University of Michigan and holds an MFA from the FSU/Asolo Conservatory for Actor Training. 

Associate Professor
Paul Molnar
(620) 332-5419
pmolnar@indycc.edu

 Mr. Kenneth J. Tate is the newest addition to the theatre department, serving as ICC’s Technical Director.  Ken received his B. A. from the University of Toledo and his M.A. from Central Missouri State University.  During his career in theatre Ken has been involved in over 40 productions in one way or another.  Acting, directing and technical theatre are all things he has been involved with, but his great love is scenic design.  Ken started his teaching career at Kirtland Community College in Roscommon, MI.  While there he designed “Agnes of God” for the Kirtland Players.  Ken took his skills to Louisiana College and was there for 16 months.  While there he designed “The Imaginary Invalid”, “Shadowlands”, and “Driving Miss Daisy” which he also directed.  From there Ken moved to Central Michigan University where he worked as Scene Shop Foreman for the 1999 season.  After a brief hiatus Ken moved to Howard Payne University in Brownwood, TX.  Through a five year stint there he designed such shows as “Into the Woods”, The Pirates of Penzance”, The Boyfriend”, Summer and Smoke”, “The Importance of Being Ernest” and “Medea” the Greek tragedy, which he also directed.  Ken moved to Elizabeth City, NC in 2007 and worked at both College of the Albemarle and Elizabeth City State University.  Here he designed “Night of the Living Dead’ “Alexander and the Terrible, Horrible, No Good, Very Bad Day”, “A Year with Frog and Toad”, “Goldilocks on Trial”, “Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde”, “Frankenstein”, “Knock me a Kiss” were just a few.  Ken states his philosophy on design as such “ If the design never distracts the audience from the world of the play, that means I have created a usable, viable, believable space for the actors to work in and tell the story.”  Ken is excited to see what the future holds for ICC theatre. 

Technical Director
Kenneth J Tate
(620) 332-5461
ktate@indycc.edu

William Inge Center for the Arts 

If you would like more information about the William Inge Center for the Arts, please visit www.ingecenter.org or contact:

Producing Artistic Director
Hannah Joyce
(620) 332-5491

 hjoyce@ingecenter.org 

Hannah Joyce is the Inge Center producing artistic director as well as the director of membership programs at the Playwrights' Center. Hannah has developed the new work of some of the country’s finest playwrights over the past two decades, among them Caridad Svich, Samuel D. Hunter, and E.M. Lewis. Since 2004, she has had the privilege of celebrating visionary American playwrights through her work at the Inge Festival, first as director of operations and since 2018 as producing artistic director. Through her work both at the Inge Center and the Playwrights’ Center, she has produced countless new play development workshops with playwrights from across the country and worked with hundreds of theater artists in support of playwrights and new play development. Originally from St. Louis, Hannah has worked and performed with a number of theater companies throughout the Midwest, including the Repertory Theatre of St. Louis, St. Louis Shakespeare Company, The Uppity Theater Company, and Prison Performing Arts. Hannah’s work is dedicated to supporting professional and emerging playwrights by connecting them to resources, other artists, and producing theaters, developing their plays, and paying them fairly for their work. Hannah's education/training includes: BA Wheaton College, Lincoln Center Education teaching artist certification, and Yoga teacher training. She is a producer, arts advocate, and theater artist. 

Associate of Arts Degree in Theatre Arts 

The Associate of Arts degree program in Theatre, offers students the core training for Acting, Voice, Movement, as well as an introduction to Technical Theatre, Directing and Playwriting. Students take core theatre requirements and general education courses. This degree will transfer to four-year colleges for students interested in studying theatre and moving on to receive their BA or BFA. 

Graduates are able to: 
  • understand the role of a theatre artist 
  • apply fundamentals and conceptual skills in the creation of character, performance, and design 
  • identify major playwrights and theatre movements in an historic, cultural and social perspective 
  • demonstrate basic technical and artistic development through a collection classroom, studio, and public performances that will challenge and stretch each student 
  • transfer into Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Fine Arts programs 

Theatre Arts
Performance Track
Suggested Four-Semester Plan

Course Title Credit Hours
 

First Semester:

English Composition I

3
Voice I 3

Theatre Appreciation

3
Stagecraft I 3
Acting I 3
Rehearsal & Performance I  1
   
Term Total 16
 

Second Semester:

English Comp II

3

Movement I

3

Public Speaking

3

Acting II/Intro to Playwriting

3

Script Analysis 

3
Rehearsal & Performance II 1
   
Term Total 16
 

Third Semester:

Cultural Studies Elective

3

Health & Well-Being Elective

3

Movement II

3

Voice II

3

Play Production: Directing

3
Rehearsal & Performance III 1
   
Term Total 16
 

Fourth Semester:

College Algebra or higher

3

Laboratory Science Elective

5

Human Heritage Elective

3

Introduction to Dramatic Literature

3

Audition Techniques

1
Rehearsal & Performance IV 1
Term Total 16
   

Total

64

*See Courses that meet Liberal Studies Graduation Requirements for a list of courses 

Theatre Course Offerings:

  • Acting I - 3 Credits
  • Acting II - 3 Credits
  • Stagecraft I - 3 Credits
  • Stage Make-up - 3 Credits
  • Script Analysis - 3 Credits
  • Play Production: Directing - 3 Credits
  • Introduction to Dramatic Literature - 3 Credits
  • Contemporary Dramatic Literature - 3 Credits
  • Audition Techniques and Strategies - 1 Credit
  • Theatrical Design I - 3 Credits
  • Theatrical Design II - 3 Credits
  • Stage/Theatre Management - 3 Credits
  • Introduction to Playwriting - 3 Credits
  • Voice I - 3 Credits
  • Voice II - 3 Credits
  • Movement I - 3 Credits
  • Movement II - 3 Credits
  • Applied Voice I - 1 Credit
  • Applied Voice II - 1 Credit
  • Applied Voice III - 1 Credit
  • Applied Voice IV - 1 Credit

Theatre Course Descriptions 2020

Audition Techniques & Strategies (THR2311) 1 hr. Designed to work on individual needs in the more advanced actor. Emphasizes selection and preparation of audition material, understanding one’s type, resume and headshot presentation. Prerequisite: Acting II (THR1123)

Acting I (THR1023) 3 hrs. Acquaints the student with acting techniques and disciplines. The course utilizes ensemble exercises, improvisation, and acting scenes to emphasize objective, obstacle and action as means to create a believable character. 

Acting II (THR1123) 3 hrs. Designed to advance the student’s understanding of principles explored in Acting I. The course will focus on developing the actor’s instruments, accessing the five senses, implementing advanced understanding of acting theory and practice, stretching the actor’s range, and giving constructive criticism. This course employs the acting philosophy and exercises of Constantin Stanislavsky, Uta Hagen, and Viola Spolin. Prerequisite: Acting I (THR1023)

Ballet I (THR1081) 1 hr. This progressive ballet system is designed to produce muscular strength, flexibility, and a working knowledge of anatomy, plus the aesthetic satisfaction of expressing yourself through a classical art form. This course is offered to students of all ages and experience, both beginners as well as those who have had some training. 

Introduction to Playwriting (THR1093) 3 hrs. This class introduces the craft of writing for the theatre. Through weekly assignments, in class writing exercises, and work on a sustained piece, students explore scene structure, action, events, voice, and dialogue. The class will examine produced play scripts and discuss student work. This class’s emphasis is on process, risk-taking, and finding one’s own voice and vision. The process focus will be on the creation of, at least, a ten-minute play. Professional guest lecturers will be used when available on campus. Prerequisite or Co-requisite: English Composition I (ENG1003) or English Composition I (ENG1012)

Jazz Dance I (THR1041) 1 hr. This course is an introduction to the concepts and motor skills involved with jazz dance. Basic body position will be introduced, as well as basic terminology, jazz history, various jazz styles and the basic techniques involved, isolations, combinations, choreography and musical/rhythmic influences.

Movement I (THR1143) 3 hrs. This course is an introduction to physical theatre training. Our main goals are to expand and strengthen each actor’s movement and gestural skill base, develop a wider range of physical tensions, densities, shapes and rhythms available on impulse. We will investigate extensive training and warm-up techniques that will address the particular needs of individual actors, while building the ensemble. All of your current and previous training in acting and vocal production will be integrated in this course. 

Movement II (THR2143) 3 hrs. This course is an introduction and exploration of technical and aesthetic aspects of stage combat. Our main goals are to understand how stage combat fits into the practice of theatre as a whole, and to develop the ability to safely portray violence onstage within the context of a play with specificity and dramatic power. All of your current and previous training in acting, voice, and movement will be integrated in this course. We will be investigating various martial forms to develop a specific vocabulary for the stage. Prerequisite: Movement I (THR1143) 3 hrs.  

Play Production: Directing (THR2003) 3 hrs. Introduces students to the fundamentals of stage direction, exploring the use of space, shape, time and movement as elements in effective theatrical story-telling. Introduces student to the practical aspects of a stage director’s duties. Each student will direct a one-act play as a semester project. Prerequisite: Theatre Appreciation (THR1013) or consent of the instructor. 

Play Production Practicum (THR1011) 1 hr. Students will be involved in artistic and production management of the annual Anna Plays. 

Playwriting II (THR1193) 3 hrs. Playwriting II centers upon writing a full one-act play as well as continuing work on writing 10-minute plays. Students will research and sketch a plot and follow that plot to a cohesive conclusion. Students will participate in further study of how to read plays like a playwright, looking at how plays are structured in the one-act form. And, they will continue learning to observe and see the world as a playwright and writer. Each term will be taught by a different set of playwrights in residence through the William Inge Center for the Arts. 

Rehearsal & Performance Lab I (THR1051) 1 hr. Students may earn from one to three hours credit by participating in a major college production. Credit may be earned as an actor or as a member of the production staff or both. Enrollment will be through appointment with the director or technical director of the production. 

Rehearsal & Performance Lab II (THR2051) 1 hr. Students may earn from one to three hours credit by participating in a major college production. Credit may be earned as an actor or as a member of the production staff or both. Enrollment will be through appointment with the director or technical director of the production. Prerequisite: Rehearsal & Performance Lab I (THR1051) 

Rehearsal & Performance Lab III (THR2061) 1 hr. Students may earn from one to three hours credit by participating in a major college production. Credit may be earned as an actor or as a member of the production staff or both. Enrollment will be through appointment with the director or technical director of the production. Prerequisite: Rehearsal & Performance Lab II (THR2051) 

Rehearsal & Performance Lab IV (THR2071) 1 hr. Students may earn from one to three hours credit by participating in a major college production. Credit may be earned as an actor or as a member of the production staff or both. Enrollment will be through appointment with the director or technical director of the production. Prerequisite: Rehearsal & Performance Lab III (THR2061) 

Script Analysis (THR2103) 3 hrs. An introductory course in script analysis for actors, directors, and designers interested in deepening their understanding of how a script works to become a living play. Examines various approaches to reading plays as dramatic texts and as the basis for production; focusing on elements such as structure, action, character, given circumstances, exposition, image, theme, and ideas. Prerequisite: English Composition I (ENG1003) or English Composition I (ENG1012)

Stage Makeup (THR2022) 2 hrs. The principles and practices of theatrical makeup are examined and applied in the laboratory assignments and lecture/demonstrations that are designed to develop the student’s skill in makeup. 

Stagecraft I (THR1033) 3 hrs. The fundamentals of sketching, building and painting scenery, stage lighting, and creating sound reinforcement for theatrical production are taught in this course. Students are required to work lab hours outside of class times and to work on theatre department productions during the semester. 

Stagecraft II (THR1133) 3 hrs. The fundamentals of sketching, building, and painting props, costuming, and puppetry for theatrical production are taught in this course. Students are required to work lab hours outside of class time and to work on theatre department productions during the semester. 

Stage/Theatre Management (THR2073) 3 hrs. An introductory course in the structure of theatrical management and the techniques of stage management. This class will give you a “nuts and bolts” knowledge of paperwork and procedures, the first steps to effective stage management, and explore how stage managers function within the theatrical management structure. Attention is given to best practices in the less tangible aspects of management such as facilitating creative work, prioritizing, problem-solving, and facilitating conflict resolution. Prerequisite: Theatre appreciation (THR1013) 

Tap Dance I (THR1091) 1 hr. An introduction to tap dance techniques emphasizing fundamentals of body placement, vocabulary, and styles in tap. Students will develop dance combinations to enhance technical skills, memory, and performance qualities. 

Technical Theatre Lab I (THR1061) 1 hr. Practicum in Theatre with emphasis on technique and procedures with experience gained in technical backstage duties and scene shop maintenance. May be repeated for credit, but not more than four semester hours total may be counted toward graduation. Required each semester of all Theatre scholarship recipients. 

Technical Theatre Lab II (THR1071) 1hr. Practicum in Theatre with emphasis on technique and procedures with experience gained in technical backstage duties and scene shop maintenance. May be repeated for credit, but not more than four semester hours total may be counted toward graduation. Required each semester of all Theatre scholarship recipients. 

Technical Theatre Lab III (THR2021) 1hr. Practicum in Theatre with emphasis on technique and procedures with experience gained in technical backstage duties and scene shop maintenance. May be repeated for credit, but not more than four semester hours total may be counted toward graduation. Required each semester of all Theatre scholarship recipients. 

Technical Theatre Lab IV (THR2041) 1hr. Practicum in Theatre with emphasis on technique and procedures with experience gained in technical backstage duties and scene shop maintenance. May be repeated for credit, but not more than four semester hours total may be counted toward graduation. Required each semester of all Theatre scholarship recipients. 

Theatre Appreciation (THR1013) 3 hrs. How has theatre developed in different parts of the world over the past 2500 years? What is happening on Broadway and in the professional theatre today? What goes into a good local theatre production? Theatre Appreciation will provide the student with answers to these questions and enhance the student’s ability to analyze and enjoy theatre productions during the semester. Students will read about the history of theatre, will study various scripts, and will see videos and live performances of plays. 

Theatre Company Ensemble (THR1101 or SRV0730) 0-1 hr. This class encompasses the creation and running of a theatre company ensemble. Making extensive use of Inge Center professional guest artists, staff and faculty, the theatre ensemble class trains together to learn to tackle the theatrical challenges that face a producing artistic ensemble This course is required for all theatre and playwriting scholarship students but is open to any students on campus. Admitting preference is given to theatre majors and fine arts scholarship students, though all interested students are welcome. 

Theatrical Design I (THR2083) 3 hrs. Theatrical Design I will provide an opportunity for students to apply their creative abilities in designing scenery for theatrical use. Students will learn the basics of the design process, how to research and apply that new found knowledge within the context of the script to create a “world” in which the characters will live. Prerequisite: Theatre Appreciation (THR1013) 3 hrs.

Theatrical Design II (THR2183) 3 hrs. Design I focuses on the general theories and working knowledge needed for an understanding of the theatrical design process, with an emphasis on scenic design. Design II follows up on this learning, and explores how the same principles are used when designing lighting, sound, costumes, props and makeup for theatre. Prerequisite: Theatrical Design I (THR2083) 

Voice I (THR1083) 3 hrs. This class introduces the student to the fundamentals of vocal use for the stage. Topics addressed will be vocal anatomy and awareness, breath release, resonance, and sensitivity to impulse. The class will employ the vocal progression of exercises designed by Kristin Linklater. The goal of the course is to find a free voice in a free, dynamically responsive body. 

Voice II (THR 2173) 3 hrs. This class introduces the students to the International Phonetic Alphabet. Topics addressed will be vowels, consonants, diphthongs, the relationship between tension and regional accents, and learning accents for stage work. This class will employ the Phonetic Pillows designed by Louis Colaianni and the vocal progression developed by Kristin Linklater. The goal of the course is to utilize a free voice and a free dynamic body to apply phonetics for character development. Prerequisite: Voice I (THR1083) 3 hrs.